Games are exceptionally motivating systems of control. Many games succeed in keeping players occupied and interested for a rather long time. How do they do this? Are motivational systems in Indie games different or do they use similar strategies as AAA games? To what extent does the reward and punishment system change when players do not voluntarily play, but need to be involved into learning and therapeutic processes in serious games? The conference on "Gamez & ruleZ" at "Kunstraum Walcheturm" in Zurich, Switzerland, sets the focus on motivational design for games from november 4 - 5, 2016.

 

Program: Friday, November 4

  gameZ & rulez conference track
10:00 Opening Conference
10:15 Keynote #1: Dr. Florian Müller, Exertion Games Lab Melbourne (AUS). Experiencing the Body as Digital Play.
11:15 Dr. Mela Kocher & Anna Martin-Niedecken, Game Design ZHdK (CH). Move it, move it! Bodycentered Game Mechanics in Urban Games & Exergames.
12:00 Lunch
13:30 Petr Pouchly, Court of Moravia (CZ). Turn a Business into a Game like a Pirate!
14:30 René Bauer, Game Design ZHdK (CH) & Sarah Celebioglu, TriCAT (D), Pas Schmid (CH). Motivational Design in iMoMo: Innovative Technologies for Monitoring, Modeling and Managing Water.
15:30 Coffee Break
16:00 Wolfgang Walk, Grumpy Old Men (D). Ethics in Game Mechanics.
  gameZfestival indie game talks track
18:00-22:00 Indie Game Talks and Exhibition "Motivate Play"
open 
[More on gamezfestival.ch ]
   

Program: Saturday, November 5

  gameZ & rulez conference track
09:30 Coffee
10:00 Imre Hofmann (CH). How to conceptually model a general game mechanics framework?
11:00 Dr Hiloko Kato (D/ CH). Guiding Principles in Videogames - Key Elements of Motivational Design?
12:00 Lunch
13:30 Keynote #2: Miguel Sicart, Game Center Copenhagen (DK). Playing Systems: [exploring] erasing the frontiers of play.
14:30 Patrick Winkler, Gameforge/Robot Entertainment (D). Retention Design for Orcs Must Die! Unchained.
15:30 End of Conference Track and Coffee Break
  gameZfestival indie game talks track
16:00
-24:00
Indie Game Talks and Exhibition "Motivate Play"
open 
[More on gamezfestival.ch ]

 

Program: Sunday, November 6

12:00
-18:00
Indie Game Talks and Exhibition "Motivate Play"
open 
[More on gamezfestival.ch ]
 

Join the gameZfestival.

Exhibition: motivate play

Friday, Nov. 4 Opening + 18:00 - 24.00
Saturday, Nov. 5 10:00 - 24.00
Sunday, Nov. 6 12:00 - 19.00

Highlights: Ideas for Game (Game Creation Set), [...]

Focus of the exhibition is motivational design for games. Commercial games succeed in keeping players occupied and interested for a long time. How do they do this? Are motivational systems in Indie games different or do they use similar strategies? To what extent does the reward and punishment system change when players do not voluntarily play, but need to be involved into learning and therapeutic processes in serious games? What design strategies should be chosen for creating intrinsic motivation out of extrinsic motivation? The exhibition "Motivate Play" tries to answer this questions in focusing on game mechanics and 'meaningful' gameplay interactions.

Games are control systems that are exceptionally motivating. From simple motivational techniques such as clearing or aligning game designers develop cybernetic control systems (such as Tetris) that are gradually getting more complex. The simplest and most complete control system in game mechanics is the continual challenge for the player and his avatar. The game provides the player with a specific challenge: In Tetris falling blocks and overflowing containers. And it offers opportunities for action to tackle the problem. In Tetris you can move and rotate the blocks. In a next step the game evaluates the player's decision. The game rewards correct decisions. In Tetris a line disappears, you get positive sound, points and more playtime. However the game punishes wrong decisions. In Tetris you get an obstructed situation, gloomy sounds, and game over. As a player, if you are perfectly challenged, conservatively punished and well rewarded you may feel like floating through the game (Flow, Csíkszentmihályi/Scheurer).

Fee

Free exhibition & talks. Feel free to come and discuss.

Contact

Twitter: @gamelabch
Twitter Hash: #gamezandrulez
Phone: 079 364 33 72
Email: info@gamezandrulez.ch

gameZandRulez 2015 (1.0)

The growing importance of game design for virtual and real-world contexts raises the question of structure and design of rules for game, play, art, technology and urban culture. The first conference on "Gamez & ruleZ" at "Kunstraum Walcheturm" in Zurich, Switzerland, was exploring and discussing these relationships from october 3 - 6, 2015. 
www.gameZandRuleZ.ch/2015/ >

Organisation

November 4 - 5, International Conference "Gamez & ruleZ" at Kunstraum Walcheturm Zurich, Switzerland, organized by Mela Kocher from the master's program Game Design and the management of the GameLab, Beat Suter and René Bauer. gameZ & ruleZ is part of the gameZfestival. The exhibition "Motivate Play" is curated by the game design master students at the Zurich University of the Arts, Department of Design (ZHdK): Goran Saric, Don Schmocker, Christian Schmidhalter, Daniel Borges Goncalves, Patrik Toth, Francine Rotzetter and Think Swiss researcher Rebecca Goodine from the University of New Brunswick, Canada.